winter math games for kidsWinter brings with it snow and where there is snow, there is fun. From snowball fights to making snowmen, there are so many fun activities one can do in winter. Even when indoors, a family can gather together and enjoy the holidays with some fun games and activities. So why not make things a bit more interesting and challenging, with some fun winter math games for kids? Here they are:

SnowBall Math

Source: Cloudfront.net

This is an outdoor winter math game for kids that can be played in the snow by throwing snowballs. Whoever has the highest score after 10 throws, wins.

Things Needed:

  • Snow
  • Stick

How to Play:

  • Make snowballs.
  • Draw the numbers 1 to 10 in the snow with the stick.
  • Throw the snowballs at the numbers.
  • Add the numbers the snowballs falls on.

Counting Snowballs

Source: Photobucket.com

Have kids place cotton ‘snowballs’ on papers with numbers on them.

Things Needed:

  • Small Paper Cards
  • Cotton Balls

How to Play:

  • Write numbers 1 to 10 on paper cards.
  • Place the cards face down on the table.
  • Place the cotton balls on the table.
  • Flip one of the cards.
  • Place cotton balls according to the number on the card.

Feed the Snowman

Source: Blogspot.com

In this winter math game for kids, roll a dice to find out how many cotton “snowballs” you need to put into the “snowman”

Things Needed:

  • Large Transparent Container for the “Snowman”
  • Dice
  • Cotton Balls, Possibly of Different Colors

How to Play:

  • Place the “Snowman” and the “Snowballs” on the table.
  • Roll dice to find a number.
  • Put same amount of “Snowballs” in the “Snowman”

Santa’s Beard Roll and Count Math Game

Source: Notimeforflashcards.com

Fill Santa’s beard with yummy marshmallows before your opponent does to win this winter math game for kids.¬†

Things Needed:

  • Marshmallows
  • Sheets of Paper
  • Markers
  • Dice

How to Play:

  • Draw the face of Santa on the sheet of paper. Make the beard as big as possible.
  • Make as many Santa faces as there are players.
  • Write numbers from 1 to 6 within Santa’s beard as many times as possible.
  • Roll the dice.
  • Place a marshmallow on a number on Santa’s ¬†beard matching the number on the dice.

Jenga Tree – A Christmas-y Winter Math Game for Kids

Source: Pinterest.com

Take out Jenga blocks out of the “Christmas Tree” and finish the calculation on the block. You lose if the “Christmas tree” falls over on your turn or if you give an incorrect answer. Last player standing wins this winter math game.

Things Needed:

  • Jenga Blocks
  • Paper Strips
  • Glue
  • Marker

How to Play:

  • Paste the paper strips on the jenga blocks and write math problems on them. For example: 5 x 6 =?
  • Build the “Christmas Tree”.
  • Take out a brick and finish the calculation on it to proceed.

Snowman Counting Winter Math Game for Kids

Source: The firstgradeparade.com

Kids will throw paper discs on a cutout of a snowman with numbers and put that many snowflakes on a tens frame.

Things Needed:

  • Chart Paper
  • Marker
  • Cardboard

How to Play:

  • Draw a snowman on the chart paper and cut it out.
  • Write numbers 1 to 10 on it.
  • Make small discs out of the cardboard.
  • Make a tens frame on another piece of chart paper.
  • Draw and cut out small snowflakes out of the chart paper.
  • Throw the discs on the snowman and note the number it lands on
  • Place an equal number of snowflakes on the tens frame.

Build the Snowman

winter math games for kids - building a snowman

Take turns to build a snowman out of round cotton balls by rolling a dice. The first player to reach 20 cotton balls wins.

Things Needed:

  • Cotton Balls
  • Markers
  • Dice

How to Play:

  • Make one cotton ball the head of the snowman, for each player, by using the markers.
  • Roll the dice and place that many cotton balls under the head of the snowman.

To Round Things Up

7-winter-math-games-for-kids

These winter math games for kids will provide hours of entertainment and also provide your kids with tons of mathematical practice. You can also tweak the games to make them more or less difficult. If you liked this article, be sure to read other interesting articles on the Logic Roots Math Blog.